Vol. 54 No. 3 (2015)
Research Papers

Characterization of a new partitivirus strain in <em>Verticillium dahliae</em> provides further evidence of the spread of the highly virulent defoliating pathotype through new introductions

Mari Carmen CAÑIZARES
Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea “La Mayora”- Universidad de Málaga - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Estación Experimental “La Mayora”, 29750 Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
Encarnación PÉREZ-ARTÉS
Department of Crop Protection, Instituto de Agricultura Sostenible, IAS-CSIC, Alameda del Obispo s/n. Apdo 4084, 14080 Córdoba, Spain
Nicolás GARCÍA-PEDRAJAS
Department of Computing and Numerical Analysis, C2 Building 3rd Floor, Campus Universitario de Rabanales, 14071 Córdoba, Spain
María GARCÍA-PEDRAJAS
Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea "La Mayora", CSIC
Published December 30, 2015
Keywords
  • Vascular pathogens,
  • defoliating pathotype,
  • migration,
  • mycoviruses
How to Cite
[1]
M. C. CAÑIZARES, E. PÉREZ-ARTÉS, N. GARCÍA-PEDRAJAS, and M. GARCÍA-PEDRAJAS, “Characterization of a new partitivirus strain in <em>Verticillium dahliae</em&gt; provides further evidence of the spread of the highly virulent defoliating pathotype through new introductions”, Phytopathol. Mediterr., vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 516-523, Dec. 2015.

Abstract

The soilborne pathogen Verticillium dahliae, causal agent of Verticillium wilt, has a worldwide distribution and many hosts of agronomic value. The worldwide spread of a highly virulent defoliating (D) pathotype has greatly increased the threat posed by V. dahliae in olive trees. For effective disease management, it is important to know if the D pathotype is spreading long distances from contaminated material, or if D pathotype isolates may have originated locally from native V. dahliae populations several times. We identified a double-stranded RNA mycovirus in an olive D pathotype isolate from Turkey. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis clustered the virus with members of the family Partitiviridae. The virus was most similar to a partitivirus previously identified in a V. dahliae isolate from cotton in China (VdPV1), with sequence identities of 94% and 91% at the nucleotide level for RNA1 and RNA2, respectively. The virus therefore corresponded to a strain of the established species, and we designated it VdPV1-ol (VdPV1 from olive). The identification of the same viral species in these two fungal isolates from geographically distant origins provides evidence of their relationships, supporting the hypothesis of long-distance movement of V. dahliae isolates.

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